Judicial Reform Bill

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The judicial reform bill will be based on prior legislation posted on Slideshare. While the aforementioned bill deals specifically with impeachment of judges who override the will of the people by overturning ballot referendums (typically the ballot referendums dealt with marriage, defining it as between one man and one woman, but some also created abortion restrictions), new reforms are being added, including:

Impeachment of Corrupt Judges/Prosecutors

Corrupt judges are defined as those who unconstitutionally override the will of the people by overturning ballot referendums. Ballot referendum-based laws are directly decided by popular vote and as such reflect the democratic will of voters. Any judge who overturns them is imposing, like a dictator, his will on the majority of Americans, and should clearly be removed from office. Similarly, any officials who go along with such dictatorial, unConstitutional actions should likewise be removed from office.

Officials to Be Impeached

Supreme Court

The following Supreme Court judges should be impeached for voting to strike down 30 ballot referendums voted for by roughly 40 million voters in Obergefell v. Hodges.[1] Democracy is at the heart of the U.S. Constitution, and as Abraham Lincoln said we are a government "of the people, by the people, for the people." Thus these judges acted without precedent in overturning dozens of laws directly based on the will of the American people. They opposed their own legal principles such as stare decisis (precedent dictated contrary per Lawrence v. Texas) and strict scrutiny (since most states had recently passed laws against homosexual marriage, and the right had historically been regulated since the time of the 14th Amendment - most states outlawed sodomy at the time of the 14th Amendment's passage, thus claiming said states intended to protect homosexual marriage under the auspices of the 14th Amendment is absurd). Such opposition to democracy by Supreme Court judges is unprecedented.

  • Sonia Sotomayor
  • Anthony Kennedy
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg
  • Stephen Breyer
  • Elena Kagan

States

Alabama

  • Callie V. Granade, for striking down a 2006 Alabama ballot referendum law defining marriage as between one man and one woman, Alabama Amendment 774, in Searcy v. Strange.

Alaska

  • Timothy M. Burgess, for striking down a 1998 Alaska ballot referendum law prohibiting same-sex marriage, Alaska Ballot Measure 2, in Hamby v. Parnell.
  • John Sedwick, for striking down the 2008 Arizona ballot referendum law defining marriage as between one man and one woman (Proposition 102) as passed by 56.2% of Arizonans, in Connolly v. Jeanes and Majors v. Horne.

Arkansas

  • Chris Piazza, for striking down a 2004 Arkansas ballot referendum law prohibiting same-sex marriage, Constitutional Amendment 3.

California

  • Stephen Reinhardt, for opposing California's Proposition 8 in Perry v. Brown, opposing Idaho's 2006 ballot referendum law prohibiting same-sex marriage, Idaho Amendment 2, and striking down a Nevada 2002 ballot referendum law prohibiting same-sex marriage, Nevada Question 2. Reinhardt additionally opposed a Congressional law, the Defense of Marriage Act.
  • Michael D. Hawkins, for opposing California's Proposition 8 in Perry v. Brown.
  • Jerry Brown (currently Governor of California), for refusing to defend California's Proposition 8 while an Attorney General.
  • Kamala Harris (currently U.S. Senator for California), for refusing to defend California's Proposition 8 while an Attorney General.
  • Dianna J. Gould-Saltman
  • Alex Kozinski
  • Sidney R. Thomas
  • M. Margaret McKeown
  • Raymond C. Fisher
  • Susan R. Bolton
  • Milan D. Smith Jr.
  • Jacqueline H. Nguyen
  • Paul J. Watford
  • Marsha Siegel Berzon, for opposing California's Proposition 8 in Perry v. Brown.

Colorado

  • C. Scott Crabtree, for striking down Colorado's 2006 ballot referendum law prohibiting same-sex marriage, Amendment 43, per Brinkman v. Long.

Florida

  • Robert L. Hinkle, for striking down Florida's 2008 ballot referendum law defining marriage as between a man and a woman, Amendment 2, in Brenner v. Scott.

Georgia

  • William Duffey, for opposing Georgia's 2004 ballot referendum law defining marriage as between a man and a woman and prohibiting same-sex marriage, Constitutional Amendment 1.

Idaho

  • Candy Wagahoff Dale, for striking down Idaho's 2006 ballot referendum law defining marriage as between a man and a woman, Marriage Definition Amendment.

Kansas

  • Daniel D. Crabtree, for striking down Kansas' 2005 ballot referendum law banning same-sex marriage, Kansas Amendment 1, in Marie v. Moser.
  • Kevin Moriarty, for opposing Kansas' 2005 ballot referendum law banning same-sex marriage, Kansas Amendment 1, in Schmidt v. Moriarty.

Kentucky

  • John G. Heyburn II, for striking down Kentucky's 2004 Marriage Amendment, which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.
  • Martha Craig Daughtrey

Louisiana

  • Martin Feldman

Michigan

  • Bernard Friedman, for striking down Michigan's 2004 ballot referendum law, Proposal 2, which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

Mississippi

  • Carlton Reeve, for striking down Mississippi's 2004 ballot referendum law, Marriage Definition Amendment, which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

Montana

  • Brian Morris

Nebraska

  • Richard J. Kopf
  • Joseph F. Bataillon, for striking down Nebraska's 2000 ballot referendum law, Measure 416, which had banned same-sex marriage.

Nevada

  • James Mahan

North Carolina

  • Max Cogburn, for striking down North Carolina's 2012 Same Sex Marriage Amendment 1, a ballot referendum law which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

North Dakota

  • Ralph Erickson
  • Wayne Stenehjem

Ohio

  • Timothy S. Black

Oklahoma

  • Terrence Kern

Oregon

  • Harry Pregerson
  • Michael McShane, for striking down Oregon's 2004 Marriage Measure 36, a ballot referendum law which banned same-sex marriage and defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

South Carolina

  • Richard Gergel, for striking down South Carolina's 2006 Amendment 1, a ballot referendum law which defined marriage as between a man and a woman.

South Dakota

  • Karen Schreier

Tennessee

  • Aleta Arthur Trauger

Texas

  • Orlando Garcia

Utah

  • Robert J. Shelby
  • Carlos F. Lucero
  • Jerome Hol

Wyoming

  • Scott Skahvdahl

Tort Reform

False Testimony Penalties

To discourage frivolous lawsuits, those who falsely accuse others are ineligible from testifying ever again, and must undergo the same penalties they falsely sought against the defendant. These reforms are based on the early constitutional reforms enacted by William Penn's Province of Pennsylvania.

Payment of Other Party's Legal Fees

As a minor deterrent, those who lose lawsuits should pay up to $1,000 of the other party's legal fees. For wording, see Section 401(a) of my 2010 healthcare bill.

Accountability for Judicial Officials

Public officials should be more accountable, not less, and held responsible for crimes. Any judges, district attorneys, or prosecutors found guilty of crimes above misdemeanors should be removed from and kept from holding public office for 20 years.

Any judges, district attorneys, or prosecutors found guilty of mishandling cases to cause conviction of innocent people should furthermore be required to undergo the cumulative sentences of those they wrongly convicted, and $50,000 paid to those pardoned per year of imprisonment with such sum to come first from the estate(s) of the guilty official(s) and then if necessary from the federal/state/local government for which they were employed.

For wording see Section 403 of my 2010 healthcare bill. These reforms are similar to early constitutional reforms enacted by William Penn's Province of Pennsylvania.

References

  1. "Marriage and Family on the Ballot." Ballotpedia.